Home sci-tech Coronavirus: ‘Reading about virus online makes me anxious’

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Coronavirus: ‘Reading about virus online makes me anxious’

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Coronavirus: 'Reading about virus online makes me anxious'

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Brooke wants school children to be able to talk about the challenges they face

"I think it's a difficult time and it's okay if you're fighting, because everyone is fighting."

Brooke, 17, was eager to read about the coronavirus outbreak on social media, so she created a book club to stay connected.

Today, thousands of children are being educated at home amid strict restrictions on people's movement.

Child commissioner Sally Holland said that mental health is just as important as physical health.

Brooke, from Ammanford, finished school before completing her GCSEs and wants other young people to be able to talk about the challenges they face.

"I was a year late to classify my grades because I was sick for a long time, so I felt really upset when they were canceled," she said.

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"I think it is a very difficult time for everyone, as well as for young people who suffer from mental health problems.

"I suffer from depression and anxiety and my whole life I have been told to go out and socialize, and now I am told the opposite.

"I think it's a difficult time and it's okay if you're fighting, because everyone is fighting."

Coronavirus: 'Reading about virus online makes me anxious'

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Media CaptionHow to promote a "calm" feeling in homes

Holland asked parents and guardians to be aware of the struggles children may face as they stay indoors and do not see their friends.

"In addition to doing the very important job of ensuring that everyone is physically safe and well, we all need to take care of our mental health and well-being as well, and that includes, of course, the mental health and well-being of our children and young people , who can be affected by it in ways we still don't fully understand, "she said.

She said the important thing is that those who struggle should not "feel abandoned" and should seek support that still exists.

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Ceri Reed

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Ceri Reed believes it is important that children's mental health in families is not neglected

A mother of three, Ceri Reed founded the Parents Voices group in Wales for people whose children have mental health problems or additional learning needs.

It has 650 members and – although many struggled with restrictions in the beginning – she said they have now begun to realize what is most important to their children.

"The initial panic, perhaps of learning at home, and the tension of all of that are alleviated, and it is easing and we are realizing, in fact, that the well-being of families, parents and children is a general priority," he said. she.

Some parents have raised concerns about the long-term impact of the coronavirus, but Aneurin Bevan health counselor clinical psychologist Liz Gregory believes there are simple steps to help.

Staying calm

She said: "Just as anxiety spreads, so does calm. So we are trying to spread calm across homes across the country.

"C – create new routines and rituals, A – ask an adult, don't let worries get in your head.

"L – do adorable things and laugh. You can't be anxious and laugh at the same time. And M – get the most out of it."

She said that we are at a point in history where we will look back, adding, "What will you say to future generations about how you handled the blockade?"

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